Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Teucer and Tjekker

"The king of Dor in the coast of Dor, one; the king of the nations of Gilgal, one;" -- Joshua 12:23
"So saying Telamonian Aias departed, and with him went Teucer, his own brother, begotten of one father, and with them Pandion bare the curved bow of Teucer." -- Homer, Iliad, Book XII, 370
"And I once saw a fellow filled with folly, Who gloried scornfully in his neighbour's woes. So it came to pass that someone like myself, And of like mood, beholding him spoke thus. 'Man, act not wickedly towards the dead; Or, if thou dost, be sure that thou wilt rue it.' Thus did he monish that infatuate man. And lo! yonder I see him; and as I think, He is none else but thou. Do I speak riddles?" -- Teucer in Sophocles, Ajax
"Soon mighty and fell will the strife be begun. But speedily now, Teucer, I pray thee, Seek some fit place for his hollow grave, Which men's memories evermore shall praise, As he lies there mouldering at rest." -- Sophocles, Ajax
"Indeed, I myself remember well Teucer’s coming to Sidon, when exiled from his native land he sought a new kingdom by aid of Belus; my father Belus was then wasting rich Cyprus, and held it under his victorious sway. From that time on the fall of the Trojan city has been known to me; known, too, your name and the Pelasgian kings. Foe thou he was, he often lauded the Teucrians with highest praise and claimed that he was sprung from the Teucrians’ ancient stock." -- Queen Dido in Virgil, Aeneid,
"Then for the archery-test Oileus' son stood forth with Teucer, they which in the race erewhile contended. Far away from these Agamemnon, lord of spears, set up a helm crested with plumes, and spake: 'The master-shot is that which shears the hair-crest clean away.' Then straightway Aias shot his arrow first, and smote the helm-ridge: sharply rang the brass. Then Teucer second with most earnest heed shot: the swift shaft hath shorn the plume away. Loud shouted all the people as they gazed, and praised him without stint, for still his foot halted in pain, yet nowise marred his aim when with his hands he sped the flying shaft." -- Quintus Smyrnaeus, The Fall of Troy, Book IV
"Idomeneus was then a resident of Corinth; to which city Diomedes and Teucer also came when driven away from their homes. Teucer had been prohibited from landing on Salamis by Telamon, his father, because, no doubt, he had not prevented his brother Ajax’ ignominious death." -- Dictys Cretensis, Book VI
"When the Cretans heard of Helen’s arrival, many men and women from all over the island came together, desiring to see her for whose sake almost all of the world had gone to war. Menelaus told his adventures. He had learned that Teucer, who had been banished from home, had founded a city on Cyprus called Salamis. He also reported the many wonders of Egypt. The serpents there, he said, had killed his pilot, Canopus; for whom he had built a magnificent tomb." -- Dictys Cretensis, Book VI