Thursday, September 3, 2009

Chosun Dynasty



Unfortunately I really don't know enough (or anything for that matter) to discuss this topic intelligently but am most curious to see where the discussion goes. My knowledge of Korea and Korean history is defined by Park Chan-Wook films, etc. So by popular demand: Annals of the Choson Period.

The Annals of the Choson Dynasty comprise 1,893 books covering 472 years (1392~1863) of the history of the Choson Dynasty, from the reign of King Taejo, the founder, to the end of the reign of King Cheoljong. Thick extensive set of records is considered to deal with the longest period of a single dynasty in the world. For their cultural and historic rarity, the Annals of the Choson Dynasty deserve world cultural preservation as an invaluable documentary heritage.

6 comments:

Jeffery Keown said...

I think the climate data is valuable, it may show that we as a species are either:

a. In a natural "recovery period" after the events described in the Annals

b. Accelerating the recovery faster than nature would normally proceed.

c. In the middle of some strange, temporary condition, and that there is no "normal" climate.

If the data in the Annals describe some real impact event, we now have detailed scientific record of how the recovery works. Couple this with modern instrumentation, we might just resolve a number of climate change myths on both sides of the argument.

I would really be excited if the impact site could be nailed down.

Louis Hissink said...

Jeffery

I think some US scientists and Bryant from Australia have nailed its location off New Zealand - there was a crater mapped on the sea floor and reported this year? or last year? I recall reading about it.

Louis Hissink said...

Hre is a link to an abstract - search for impact crater new zealand Bryant.

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2003AM/finalprogram/abstract_65239.htm

Louis Hissink said...

Jeffery

We are a part of Nature - why distinguish one species of simians from others for special attention?

Jeffery Keown said...

We are a part of Nature - why distinguish one species of simians from others for special attention?

Not to sound too Adamsian, but we're the only species capable of action on the scale we are able.

This is true whether you are talking about supposed massive climate change or building a shopping mall, we have an ability to change this world that is totally unlike our cousins the bonobos and chimps.

I suppose my "we as a species" was a sloppy construct. How about "Our planet is either" But we may be accelerating the process, but compared to what? There is no good data for prior impacts. Stories like those Oils is so fond of, for example. His quotes reveal that something hit Earth (North America, to be precise) around 12,000 years ago, but on what scale? and how fast was the recovery?

Its all a good lesson, really. We need to watch the skies with more attention. We're gonna get smacked hard, and pay dearly for our foolishness.

Louis Hissink said...

The US impact 12,000 years ago would prompt me to initially check out all the Indian stories of the past - they did not miss much. I received Vine Deloria's books recently, and a quick scan showed that there is some good historical data - but I have not gone into it in detail. Too many other things to deal with at present.