Friday, October 23, 2009

The U.S. Antigravity Squadron



Paul LaViolette: The U.S. Antigravity Squadron.

Electrogravitic (antigravity) technology, under development in U.S. Air Force black R&D programs since late 1954, may now have been put to practical use in the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber to provide an exotic auxiliary mode of propulsion. This inference is based on the recent disclosure that the B-2 charges both its wing leading edge and jet exhaust stream to a high voltage.

Positive ions emitted from its wing leading edge would produce a positively charged parabolic ion sheath ahead of the craft while negative ions injected into it's exhaust stream would set up a trailing negative space charge with a potential difference in excess of 15 million volts. According to electrogravitic research carried out by physicist T. Townsend Brown, such a differential space charge would set up an artificial gravity field that would induce a reactionless force on the aircraft in the direction of the positive pole.

An electrogravitic drive of this sort could allow the B-2 to function with over-unity propulsion efficiency when cruising at supersonic velocities.

For many years rumors circulated that the U.S. was secretly developing a highly advanced, radar-evading aircraft. Rumor turned to reality in November of 1988, when the Air Force unveiled the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber. Although military spokesmen provided the news media with some information about the craft's outward design, and low radar and infrared profile, there was much they were silent about. However, several years later, some key secrets about the B-2 were leaked to the press.

On March 9, 1992, "Aviation Week and Space Technology" magazine made a surprising disclosure that the B-2 electrostatically charges its exhaust stream and the leading edges of its wing-like body. Those familiar with the electrogravitics research of American physicist T. Townsend Brown will quickly realize that this is tantamount to stating that the B-2 is able to function as an antigravity aircraft.

"Aviation Week" obtained their information about the B-2 from a small group of renegade west coast scientists and engineers who were formerly associated with black research projects. In making these disclosures, these scientists broke a code of silence that rivals the Mafia's. They took the risk because they felt that it was important for economic reasons that efforts be made to declassify certain black technologies for commercial use.

Two of these individuals said that their civil rights had been blatantly abused (in the name of security) either to keep them quiet or to prevent them from leaving the tightly controlled black R&D community.

Several months after "Aviation Week" published the article, black world security personnel went into high gear. That sector of the black R&D community received VERY STRONG warnings and, as a result, the group of scientists subsequently broke off contact with the magazine. Clearly, the overseers of black R&D programs were substantially concerned about the information leaks that had come out in that article.

To completely understand the significance of what was said about the B-2, one must first become familiar with Brown's work. Beginning in the mid 1920's, Townsend Brown discovered that it is possible to create an artificial gravity field by charging an electrical capacitor to a high-voltage.

He specially built a capacitor which utilized a heavy, high charge-accumulating (high K-factor) dielectric material between its plates and found that when charges with between 70,000 to 300,000 volts, it would move in the direction of its positive pole. When oriented with its positive side up, it would proceed to lose about 1 percent of it's weight.

He attributed this motion to an electrostatically-induced gravity field acting between the capacitor's oppositely charged plates. By 1958, he had succeeded in developing a 15 inch diameter model saucer that could lift over 110% of its weight!

Brown's experiments had launched a new field of investigation which came to be known as electrogravitics, the technology of controlling gravity through the use of high-voltage electric charge.

As early as 1952, an Air Force major general witnessed a demonstration in which Brown flew a pair of 18 inch disc airfoils suspended from opposite ends of a rotatable arm. When electrified with 50,000 volts, they circuited at a speed of 12 miles per hour. About a year later, he flew a set of 3 foot diameter saucers for some Air Force officials and representatives from a number of major aircraft companies.

When energized with 150,000 volts, the discs sped around the 50 foot diameter course so fast that the subject was immediately classified. "Interavia" magazine later reported that the discs would attain speeds of several hundred miles per hour when charged with several hundred thousand volts.
Thomas Valone: Electrogravitics For Advanced Propulsion.

Recently, two 1956 military documents, "Electrogravitics Systems" and "The Gravitics Situation," originally published by the Gravity Research Group of London (Special Weapons Study Unit), were declassified. Outlining T. Townsend Brown's antigravity discovery (see Atlantis Rising, Number 22, p.35; AIR International, Jan., 2000; Jane’s Defence Weekly, 10 June 1995, p.34), and the subsequent Project Winterhaven, they were a vital new chapter in aviation research. For example, the documents state, "Unlike the turbine engine, electro-gravitics is not just a new propulsion system, it is a new mode of thought in aviation and communications, and it is something that may become all-embracing."

To explain, "electrogravitics" is the science of using high voltage electricity to provide propulsive force to aircraft or spacecraft of certain geometries. Or as Jeane Manning explains, "The apparatus is pulled along by its self-generated gravity field, like a surfer riding a wave." Its discovery is often credited to Thomas Townsend Brown, a physicist who was encouraged by his professor, Dr. Paul Biefield, a former classmate of Albert Einstein. However, there are those who say that Professor Francis Nipher's experiments, electrically charging lead balls, published in the Electrical Experimenter, in 1918, predates Biefield/Brown.

No comments: